Commit db555186 authored by luigi1111's avatar luigi1111

Merge !1234

Add new Moneropedia entry 'Remote Node', edit entry 'Node' and a couple of minor changes

See merge request monero-project/monero-site!1234
parents f88871b7 b184903c
Pipeline #421 canceled with stage
......@@ -632,6 +632,7 @@ moneropedia:
paperwallet: Paper Wallet
paymentid: Payment ID
pedersen-commitment: Pedersen Commitment
remote-node: Remote Node
reseed: Reseed
ringCT: Ring CT
ringsignatures: Ring Signature
......
---
terms: ["remote-node", "remote-nodes"]
summary: "Nodes wich are not running in the same machine as the wallet. Open remote nodes allow to use the Monero network immediately"
---
A @node that doesn't run on the same local machine where the Monero @wallet is located is called "Remote Node" and can be private or open.
A **private remote node** doesn't run on your local machine, but you have full control over it. A classic example is a node running on a VPS or a server. That node is not on your local machine, but you have full control over it. You can even decide to make it become an open node, allowing people to connect to it.
An **Open remote node** can be used by people who, for their own reasons (usually because of hardware requirements, disk space, or technical abilities), cannot/don't want to run their own node and prefer to relay on one publicly available on the Monero network. Open remote nodes are often simply referred as "remote nodes".
Using an open node will allow to make a @transaction instantaneously, without the need to download the @blockchain and sync to the Monero network first, but at the cost of the control over your privacy. the Monero community suggests to always run your own node to obtain the maximum privacy possible and to help decentralize the network.
### Public Nodes
Open nodes are cool because, as we said above, allow people who are not running their own node to immediately join the Monero network. There are 2 main ways to connect to an open node: Simply get somebody to share with you their node, by asking them to "open it" and provide you with IP address and port, or use a public one.
Public nodes are reachable in the network using two systems:
- **Node aggregators**, which are basically lists of open remote nodes. The operators of those nodes decided to add them to the aggregator so that other people can use them. The aggregator will provide to the person who want to use a remote node a simple URL. This URL connects to one of the nodes in the list and will need to be inserted in the Monero wallet (GUI or CLI). The wallet will then contact one of the nodes provided by the URL and will allow the end user to immediately receive and send transactions. One of the most famous node aggregators is [MoneroWorld](https://moneroworld.com/#nodes).
- **Native public nodes**. This is one of the new coolest features the Monero devs came up with to improve the user experience and to make easier to connect to the network. The CLI wallet allow to make a node public by simply adding the flag `--public-node`. Doing so, it will be advertised on the P2P network and people will be able to connect to it (or to another public node advertising itself in the same way) using the related option in the GUI and CLI wallets.
Be aware that using public remote nodes can be risky. Node operators can link transactions to IP addresses. These risks can be mitigated, but you should always avoid using them if you have the possibility. Run your own node!
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -633,6 +633,7 @@ moneropedia:
paperwallet: Paper-Wallet
paymentid: Payment-ID
pedersen-commitment: Pedersen-Commitment
remote-node: Remote Node
reseed: Reseed
ringCT: vertrauliche Ringtransaktionen (Ring CT)
ringsignatures: Ringsignatur
......
---
terms: ["remote-node", "remote-nodes"]
summary: "Nodes wich are not running in the same machine as the wallet. Open remote nodes allow to use the Monero network immediately"
---
A @node that doesn't run on the same local machine where the Monero @wallet is located is called "Remote Node" and can be private or open.
A **private remote node** doesn't run on your local machine, but you have full control over it. A classic example is a node running on a VPS or a server. That node is not on your local machine, but you have full control over it. You can even decide to make it become an open node, allowing people to connect to it.
An **Open remote node** can be used by people who, for their own reasons (usually because of hardware requirements, disk space, or technical abilities), cannot/don't want to run their own node and prefer to relay on one publicly available on the Monero network. Open remote nodes are often simply referred as "remote nodes".
Using an open node will allow to make a @transaction instantaneously, without the need to download the @blockchain and sync to the Monero network first, but at the cost of the control over your privacy. the Monero community suggests to always run your own node to obtain the maximum privacy possible and to help decentralize the network.
### Public Nodes
Open nodes are cool because, as we said above, allow people who are not running their own node to immediately join the Monero network. There are 2 main ways to connect to an open node: Simply get somebody to share with you their node, by asking them to "open it" and provide you with IP address and port, or use a public one.
Public nodes are reachable in the network using two systems:
- **Node aggregators**, which are basically lists of open remote nodes. The operators of those nodes decided to add them to the aggregator so that other people can use them. The aggregator will provide to the person who want to use a remote node a simple URL. This URL connects to one of the nodes in the list and will need to be inserted in the Monero wallet (GUI or CLI). The wallet will then contact one of the nodes provided by the URL and will allow the end user to immediately receive and send transactions. One of the most famous node aggregators is [MoneroWorld](https://moneroworld.com/#nodes).
- **Native public nodes**. This is one of the new coolest features the Monero devs came up with to improve the user experience and to make easier to connect to the network. The CLI wallet allow to make a node public by simply adding the flag `--public-node`. Doing so, it will be advertised on the P2P network and people will be able to connect to it (or to another public node advertising itself in the same way) using the related option in the GUI and CLI wallets.
Be aware that using public remote nodes can be risky. Node operators can link transactions to IP addresses. These risks can be mitigated, but you should always avoid using them if you have the possibility. Run your own node!
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -157,7 +157,7 @@ downloads:
hardware: Hardware Wallets
gui_intro: The GUI wallet provides a nice user interface, adaptable to all kinds of users, but it is especially recommended for less technical people who want to quickly send and receive XMR.
simplemode: Simple mode
simplemode1: Created for less technical users who only want to use Monero in the easiest and quickest way possible. Open the wallet, automatically connect to a remote node, send/receive XMR, done!
simplemode1: Created for less technical users who only want to use Monero in the easiest and quickest way possible. Open the wallet, automatically connect to a @remote-node, send/receive XMR, done!
advancedmode: Advanced mode
advancedmode1: With all the advanced features you could need. Ideal for seasoned Monero users who prefer to have full control of their wallet and node
merchantpage: Merchant page
......@@ -187,7 +187,7 @@ downloads:
transacttor: Transactions over Tor/I2P
transacttor1: For an additional layer of privacy
bootstrapnode: Bootstrap node
bootstrapnode1: Use a remote node while downloading the blockchain locally, this will allow you to use Monero immediately and switch to your local node once it's completely synced
bootstrapnode1: Use a @remote-node while downloading the blockchain locally, this will allow you to use Monero immediately and switch to your local node once it's completely synced
rpc: RPC Wallet and Daemon
rpc1: included in the archive
payforrpc: Pay-for-RPC
......@@ -646,6 +646,7 @@ moneropedia:
paperwallet: Paper Wallet
paymentid: Payment ID
pedersen-commitment: Pedersen Commitment
remote-node: Remote Node
reseed: Reseed
ringCT: Ring CT
ringsignatures: Ring Signature
......
......@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ summary: "A node to which a daemon connects to give immediate usability to walle
### The Basics
The daemon running on a local @node has to sync with other (remote) @nodes. While it is not fully synced, @wallet may still be connected to the local node. Therefore, the @wallet cannot access the @blocks that are bot yet synced on the local @node.
The daemon running on a local @node has to sync with other @remote-nodes. While it is not fully synced, @wallet may still be connected to the local node. Therefore, the @wallet cannot access the @blocks that are bot yet synced on the local @node.
To allow the @wallet to be immediately usable, the daemon on the local @node uses a bootstrap node to which the RPC request are proxying to, giving access to the missing @blocks.
......
---
terms: ["node", "nodes", "full-node", "full-nodes"]
summary: "a device on the Internet running the Monero software, with a full copy of the Monero blockchain, actively assisting the Monero network"
summary: "A device on the Internet running the Monero software, with a full copy of the Monero blockchain. It can be local or remote"
---
### The Basics
A device on the Internet running the Monero software, with a full copy of the Monero blockchain, actively assisting the Monero network.
A device on the Internet running the Monero software, with a full copy of the Monero blockchain, actively assisting the Monero network. A node that is not running on your local machine is called @remote-node. Remote nodes can be private, if they are for personal use only, or open, if they are accessible by other people.
### More Information
......@@ -15,10 +15,9 @@ Mining is the process by which nodes create a block from the previously accepted
The rules that nodes follow are built into the Monero software; When all nodes agree about the rules to follow this is called @consensus. Consensus is necessary for a cryptocurrency because it is how the blockchain is built; If nodes don't agree about which blocks are valid, for example people who have not updated their Monero software, those nodes that don't agree will no longer be able to participate in the Monero network.
The Monero Core Team plans for a network upgrade every 6 months, to occur in October and April of each year. At that time, if you are running a node it must be updated to the most recent version of the Monero software or it will no longer be able to participate in the network.
The Monero Core Team plans for a network upgrade roughly every 6 months. At that time, if you are running a node it must be updated to the most recent version of the Monero software or it will no longer be able to participate in the network.
---
##### Other Resources
<sub>1. *Fluffypony gives a great explanation of why mandatory network upgrades are good for Monero.* ([Monero Missives for the Week of 2016-06-20](https://getmonero.org/2016/06/20/monero-missive-for-the-week-of-2016-06-20.html))</sub>
<sub>1. *Fluffypony gives a great explanation of why mandatory network upgrades are good for Monero.* ([Monero Missives for the Week of 2016-06-20](https://getmonero.org/2016/06/20/monero-missive-for-the-week-of-2016-06-20.html))</sub>
\ No newline at end of file
---
terms: ["remote-node", "remote-nodes"]
summary: "Nodes wich are not running in the same machine as the wallet. Open remote nodes allow to use the Monero network immediately"
---
A @node that doesn't run on the same local machine where the Monero @wallet is located is called "Remote Node" and can be private or open.
A **private remote node** doesn't run on your local machine, but you have full control over it. A classic example is a node running on a VPS or a server. That node is not on your local machine, but you have full control over it. You can even decide to make it become an open node, allowing people to connect to it.
An **Open remote node** can be used by people who, for their own reasons (usually because of hardware requirements, disk space, or technical abilities), cannot/don't want to run their own node and prefer to relay on one publicly available on the Monero network. Open remote nodes are often simply referred as "remote nodes".
Using an open node will allow to make a @transaction instantaneously, without the need to download the @blockchain and sync to the Monero network first, but at the cost of the control over your privacy. the Monero community suggests to always run your own node to obtain the maximum privacy possible and to help decentralize the network.
### Public Nodes
Open nodes are cool because, as we said above, allow people who are not running their own node to immediately join the Monero network. There are 2 main ways to connect to an open node: Simply get somebody to share with you their node, by asking them to "open it" and provide you with IP address and port, or use a public one.
Public nodes are reachable in the network using two systems:
- **Node aggregators**, which are basically lists of open remote nodes. The operators of those nodes decided to add them to the aggregator so that other people can use them. The aggregator will provide to the person who want to use a remote node a simple URL. This URL connects to one of the nodes in the list and will need to be inserted in the Monero wallet (GUI or CLI). The wallet will then contact one of the nodes provided by the URL and will allow the end user to immediately receive and send transactions. One of the most famous node aggregators is [MoneroWorld](https://moneroworld.com/#nodes).
- **Native public nodes**. This is one of the new coolest features the Monero devs came up with to improve the user experience and to make easier to connect to the network. The daemon allows to make a node public by simply adding the flag `--public-node`. Doing so, it will be advertised on the P2P network and people will be able to connect to it (or to another public node advertising itself in the same way) using the related option in the GUI and CLI wallets.
Be aware that using public remote nodes can be risky. Node operators can link transactions to IP addresses. These risks can be mitigated, but you should always avoid using them if you have the possibility. Run your own node!
......@@ -633,6 +633,7 @@ moneropedia:
paperwallet: Monedero en Papel
paymentid: ID de Pago
pedersen-commitment: Compromiso Pedersen
remote-node: Remote Node
reseed: Resembrar
ringCT: Transacción Circular Confidencial
ringsignatures: Firmas Circulares
......
---
terms: ["remote-node", "remote-nodes"]
summary: "Nodes wich are not running in the same machine as the wallet. Open remote nodes allow to use the Monero network immediately"
---
A @node that doesn't run on the same local machine where the Monero @wallet is located is called "Remote Node" and can be private or open.
A **private remote node** doesn't run on your local machine, but you have full control over it. A classic example is a node running on a VPS or a server. That node is not on your local machine, but you have full control over it. You can even decide to make it become an open node, allowing people to connect to it.
An **Open remote node** can be used by people who, for their own reasons (usually because of hardware requirements, disk space, or technical abilities), cannot/don't want to run their own node and prefer to relay on one publicly available on the Monero network. Open remote nodes are often simply referred as "remote nodes".
Using an open node will allow to make a @transaction instantaneously, without the need to download the @blockchain and sync to the Monero network first, but at the cost of the control over your privacy. the Monero community suggests to always run your own node to obtain the maximum privacy possible and to help decentralize the network.
### Public Nodes
Open nodes are cool because, as we said above, allow people who are not running their own node to immediately join the Monero network. There are 2 main ways to connect to an open node: Simply get somebody to share with you their node, by asking them to "open it" and provide you with IP address and port, or use a public one.
Public nodes are reachable in the network using two systems:
- **Node aggregators**, which are basically lists of open remote nodes. The operators of those nodes decided to add them to the aggregator so that other people can use them. The aggregator will provide to the person who want to use a remote node a simple URL. This URL connects to one of the nodes in the list and will need to be inserted in the Monero wallet (GUI or CLI). The wallet will then contact one of the nodes provided by the URL and will allow the end user to immediately receive and send transactions. One of the most famous node aggregators is [MoneroWorld](https://moneroworld.com/#nodes).
- **Native public nodes**. This is one of the new coolest features the Monero devs came up with to improve the user experience and to make easier to connect to the network. The CLI wallet allow to make a node public by simply adding the flag `--public-node`. Doing so, it will be advertised on the P2P network and people will be able to connect to it (or to another public node advertising itself in the same way) using the related option in the GUI and CLI wallets.
Be aware that using public remote nodes can be risky. Node operators can link transactions to IP addresses. These risks can be mitigated, but you should always avoid using them if you have the possibility. Run your own node!
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -634,6 +634,7 @@ moneropedia:
paperwallet: portefeuille Papier
paymentid: ID de paiement
pedersen-commitment: Engagement de Pedersen
remote-node: Remote Node
reseed: Réensemencement
ringCT: Transactions confidentielles de cercle
ringsignatures: Signature de Cercle
......
---
terms: ["remote-node", "remote-nodes"]
summary: "Nodes wich are not running in the same machine as the wallet. Open remote nodes allow to use the Monero network immediately"
---
A @node that doesn't run on the same local machine where the Monero @wallet is located is called "Remote Node" and can be private or open.
A **private remote node** doesn't run on your local machine, but you have full control over it. A classic example is a node running on a VPS or a server. That node is not on your local machine, but you have full control over it. You can even decide to make it become an open node, allowing people to connect to it.
An **Open remote node** can be used by people who, for their own reasons (usually because of hardware requirements, disk space, or technical abilities), cannot/don't want to run their own node and prefer to relay on one publicly available on the Monero network. Open remote nodes are often simply referred as "remote nodes".
Using an open node will allow to make a @transaction instantaneously, without the need to download the @blockchain and sync to the Monero network first, but at the cost of the control over your privacy. the Monero community suggests to always run your own node to obtain the maximum privacy possible and to help decentralize the network.
### Public Nodes
Open nodes are cool because, as we said above, allow people who are not running their own node to immediately join the Monero network. There are 2 main ways to connect to an open node: Simply get somebody to share with you their node, by asking them to "open it" and provide you with IP address and port, or use a public one.
Public nodes are reachable in the network using two systems:
- **Node aggregators**, which are basically lists of open remote nodes. The operators of those nodes decided to add them to the aggregator so that other people can use them. The aggregator will provide to the person who want to use a remote node a simple URL. This URL connects to one of the nodes in the list and will need to be inserted in the Monero wallet (GUI or CLI). The wallet will then contact one of the nodes provided by the URL and will allow the end user to immediately receive and send transactions. One of the most famous node aggregators is [MoneroWorld](https://moneroworld.com/#nodes).
- **Native public nodes**. This is one of the new coolest features the Monero devs came up with to improve the user experience and to make easier to connect to the network. The CLI wallet allow to make a node public by simply adding the flag `--public-node`. Doing so, it will be advertised on the P2P network and people will be able to connect to it (or to another public node advertising itself in the same way) using the related option in the GUI and CLI wallets.
Be aware that using public remote nodes can be risky. Node operators can link transactions to IP addresses. These risks can be mitigated, but you should always avoid using them if you have the possibility. Run your own node!
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -631,6 +631,7 @@ moneropedia:
paperwallet: Portafoglio cartaceo
paymentid: ID Pagamento
pedersen-commitment: Pedersen Commitment
remote-node: Remote Node
reseed: Reseed
ringCT: Ring CT
ringsignatures: Firma ad anello
......
---
terms: ["remote-node", "remote-nodes"]
summary: "Nodes wich are not running in the same machine as the wallet. Open remote nodes allow to use the Monero network immediately"
---
A @node that doesn't run on the same local machine where the Monero @wallet is located is called "Remote Node" and can be private or open.
A **private remote node** doesn't run on your local machine, but you have full control over it. A classic example is a node running on a VPS or a server. That node is not on your local machine, but you have full control over it. You can even decide to make it become an open node, allowing people to connect to it.
An **Open remote node** can be used by people who, for their own reasons (usually because of hardware requirements, disk space, or technical abilities), cannot/don't want to run their own node and prefer to relay on one publicly available on the Monero network. Open remote nodes are often simply referred as "remote nodes".
Using an open node will allow to make a @transaction instantaneously, without the need to download the @blockchain and sync to the Monero network first, but at the cost of the control over your privacy. the Monero community suggests to always run your own node to obtain the maximum privacy possible and to help decentralize the network.
### Public Nodes
Open nodes are cool because, as we said above, allow people who are not running their own node to immediately join the Monero network. There are 2 main ways to connect to an open node: Simply get somebody to share with you their node, by asking them to "open it" and provide you with IP address and port, or use a public one.
Public nodes are reachable in the network using two systems:
- **Node aggregators**, which are basically lists of open remote nodes. The operators of those nodes decided to add them to the aggregator so that other people can use them. The aggregator will provide to the person who want to use a remote node a simple URL. This URL connects to one of the nodes in the list and will need to be inserted in the Monero wallet (GUI or CLI). The wallet will then contact one of the nodes provided by the URL and will allow the end user to immediately receive and send transactions. One of the most famous node aggregators is [MoneroWorld](https://moneroworld.com/#nodes).
- **Native public nodes**. This is one of the new coolest features the Monero devs came up with to improve the user experience and to make easier to connect to the network. The CLI wallet allow to make a node public by simply adding the flag `--public-node`. Doing so, it will be advertised on the P2P network and people will be able to connect to it (or to another public node advertising itself in the same way) using the related option in the GUI and CLI wallets.
Be aware that using public remote nodes can be risky. Node operators can link transactions to IP addresses. These risks can be mitigated, but you should always avoid using them if you have the possibility. Run your own node!
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -634,6 +634,7 @@ moneropedia:
paperwallet: Paper Wallet
paymentid: Payment ID
pedersen-commitment: Pedersen Commitment
remote-node: Remote Node
reseed: Reseed
ringCT: Ring CT
ringsignatures: Ring Signature
......
---
terms: ["remote-node", "remote-nodes"]
summary: "Nodes wich are not running in the same machine as the wallet. Open remote nodes allow to use the Monero network immediately"
---
A @node that doesn't run on the same local machine where the Monero @wallet is located is called "Remote Node" and can be private or open.
A **private remote node** doesn't run on your local machine, but you have full control over it. A classic example is a node running on a VPS or a server. That node is not on your local machine, but you have full control over it. You can even decide to make it become an open node, allowing people to connect to it.
An **Open remote node** can be used by people who, for their own reasons (usually because of hardware requirements, disk space, or technical abilities), cannot/don't want to run their own node and prefer to relay on one publicly available on the Monero network. Open remote nodes are often simply referred as "remote nodes".
Using an open node will allow to make a @transaction instantaneously, without the need to download the @blockchain and sync to the Monero network first, but at the cost of the control over your privacy. the Monero community suggests to always run your own node to obtain the maximum privacy possible and to help decentralize the network.
### Public Nodes
Open nodes are cool because, as we said above, allow people who are not running their own node to immediately join the Monero network. There are 2 main ways to connect to an open node: Simply get somebody to share with you their node, by asking them to "open it" and provide you with IP address and port, or use a public one.
Public nodes are reachable in the network using two systems:
- **Node aggregators**, which are basically lists of open remote nodes. The operators of those nodes decided to add them to the aggregator so that other people can use them. The aggregator will provide to the person who want to use a remote node a simple URL. This URL connects to one of the nodes in the list and will need to be inserted in the Monero wallet (GUI or CLI). The wallet will then contact one of the nodes provided by the URL and will allow the end user to immediately receive and send transactions. One of the most famous node aggregators is [MoneroWorld](https://moneroworld.com/#nodes).
- **Native public nodes**. This is one of the new coolest features the Monero devs came up with to improve the user experience and to make easier to connect to the network. The CLI wallet allow to make a node public by simply adding the flag `--public-node`. Doing so, it will be advertised on the P2P network and people will be able to connect to it (or to another public node advertising itself in the same way) using the related option in the GUI and CLI wallets.
Be aware that using public remote nodes can be risky. Node operators can link transactions to IP addresses. These risks can be mitigated, but you should always avoid using them if you have the possibility. Run your own node!
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -633,6 +633,7 @@ moneropedia:
paperwallet: Papierowy portfel
paymentid: Numer identyfikacyjny płatności
pedersen-commitment: Zobowiązanie Pedersena
remote-node: Remote Node
reseed: Reseed
ringCT: Poufne Transakcje Pierścieniowe
ringsignatures: Podpis pierścieniowy
......
---
terms: ["remote-node", "remote-nodes"]
summary: "Nodes wich are not running in the same machine as the wallet. Open remote nodes allow to use the Monero network immediately"
---
A @node that doesn't run on the same local machine where the Monero @wallet is located is called "Remote Node" and can be private or open.
A **private remote node** doesn't run on your local machine, but you have full control over it. A classic example is a node running on a VPS or a server. That node is not on your local machine, but you have full control over it. You can even decide to make it become an open node, allowing people to connect to it.
An **Open remote node** can be used by people who, for their own reasons (usually because of hardware requirements, disk space, or technical abilities), cannot/don't want to run their own node and prefer to relay on one publicly available on the Monero network. Open remote nodes are often simply referred as "remote nodes".
Using an open node will allow to make a @transaction instantaneously, without the need to download the @blockchain and sync to the Monero network first, but at the cost of the control over your privacy. the Monero community suggests to always run your own node to obtain the maximum privacy possible and to help decentralize the network.
### Public Nodes
Open nodes are cool because, as we said above, allow people who are not running their own node to immediately join the Monero network. There are 2 main ways to connect to an open node: Simply get somebody to share with you their node, by asking them to "open it" and provide you with IP address and port, or use a public one.
Public nodes are reachable in the network using two systems:
- **Node aggregators**, which are basically lists of open remote nodes. The operators of those nodes decided to add them to the aggregator so that other people can use them. The aggregator will provide to the person who want to use a remote node a simple URL. This URL connects to one of the nodes in the list and will need to be inserted in the Monero wallet (GUI or CLI). The wallet will then contact one of the nodes provided by the URL and will allow the end user to immediately receive and send transactions. One of the most famous node aggregators is [MoneroWorld](https://moneroworld.com/#nodes).
- **Native public nodes**. This is one of the new coolest features the Monero devs came up with to improve the user experience and to make easier to connect to the network. The CLI wallet allow to make a node public by simply adding the flag `--public-node`. Doing so, it will be advertised on the P2P network and people will be able to connect to it (or to another public node advertising itself in the same way) using the related option in the GUI and CLI wallets.
Be aware that using public remote nodes can be risky. Node operators can link transactions to IP addresses. These risks can be mitigated, but you should always avoid using them if you have the possibility. Run your own node!
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -634,6 +634,7 @@ moneropedia:
paperwallet: Carteira em Papel
paymentid: ID de Pagamento
pedersen-commitment: Comprometimento de Pedersen
remote-node: Remote Node
reseed: Reseed
ringCT: Ring CT
ringsignatures: Assinaturas em anel
......
---
terms: ["remote-node", "remote-nodes"]
summary: "Nodes wich are not running in the same machine as the wallet. Open remote nodes allow to use the Monero network immediately"
---
A @node that doesn't run on the same local machine where the Monero @wallet is located is called "Remote Node" and can be private or open.
A **private remote node** doesn't run on your local machine, but you have full control over it. A classic example is a node running on a VPS or a server. That node is not on your local machine, but you have full control over it. You can even decide to make it become an open node, allowing people to connect to it.
An **Open remote node** can be used by people who, for their own reasons (usually because of hardware requirements, disk space, or technical abilities), cannot/don't want to run their own node and prefer to relay on one publicly available on the Monero network. Open remote nodes are often simply referred as "remote nodes".
Using an open node will allow to make a @transaction instantaneously, without the need to download the @blockchain and sync to the Monero network first, but at the cost of the control over your privacy. the Monero community suggests to always run your own node to obtain the maximum privacy possible and to help decentralize the network.
### Public Nodes
Open nodes are cool because, as we said above, allow people who are not running their own node to immediately join the Monero network. There are 2 main ways to connect to an open node: Simply get somebody to share with you their node, by asking them to "open it" and provide you with IP address and port, or use a public one.
Public nodes are reachable in the network using two systems:
- **Node aggregators**, which are basically lists of open remote nodes. The operators of those nodes decided to add them to the aggregator so that other people can use them. The aggregator will provide to the person who want to use a remote node a simple URL. This URL connects to one of the nodes in the list and will need to be inserted in the Monero wallet (GUI or CLI). The wallet will then contact one of the nodes provided by the URL and will allow the end user to immediately receive and send transactions. One of the most famous node aggregators is [MoneroWorld](https://moneroworld.com/#nodes).
- **Native public nodes**. This is one of the new coolest features the Monero devs came up with to improve the user experience and to make easier to connect to the network. The CLI wallet allow to make a node public by simply adding the flag `--public-node`. Doing so, it will be advertised on the P2P network and people will be able to connect to it (or to another public node advertising itself in the same way) using the related option in the GUI and CLI wallets.
Be aware that using public remote nodes can be risky. Node operators can link transactions to IP addresses. These risks can be mitigated, but you should always avoid using them if you have the possibility. Run your own node!
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -638,6 +638,7 @@ moneropedia:
paperwallet: Бумажный кошелёк
paymentid: Идентификатор платежа
pedersen-commitment: Обязательство Педерсена
remote-node: Remote Node
reseed: Повторное заполнение
ringCT: Ring CT
ringsignatures: Кольцевая подпись
......
---
terms: ["remote-node", "remote-nodes"]
summary: "Nodes wich are not running in the same machine as the wallet. Open remote nodes allow to use the Monero network immediately"
---
A @node that doesn't run on the same local machine where the Monero @wallet is located is called "Remote Node" and can be private or open.
A **private remote node** doesn't run on your local machine, but you have full control over it. A classic example is a node running on a VPS or a server. That node is not on your local machine, but you have full control over it. You can even decide to make it become an open node, allowing people to connect to it.
An **Open remote node** can be used by people who, for their own reasons (usually because of hardware requirements, disk space, or technical abilities), cannot/don't want to run their own node and prefer to relay on one publicly available on the Monero network. Open remote nodes are often simply referred as "remote nodes".
Using an open node will allow to make a @transaction instantaneously, without the need to download the @blockchain and sync to the Monero network first, but at the cost of the control over your privacy. the Monero community suggests to always run your own node to obtain the maximum privacy possible and to help decentralize the network.
### Public Nodes
Open nodes are cool because, as we said above, allow people who are not running their own node to immediately join the Monero network. There are 2 main ways to connect to an open node: Simply get somebody to share with you their node, by asking them to "open it" and provide you with IP address and port, or use a public one.
Public nodes are reachable in the network using two systems:
- **Node aggregators**, which are basically lists of open remote nodes. The operators of those nodes decided to add them to the aggregator so that other people can use them. The aggregator will provide to the person who want to use a remote node a simple URL. This URL connects to one of the nodes in the list and will need to be inserted in the Monero wallet (GUI or CLI). The wallet will then contact one of the nodes provided by the URL and will allow the end user to immediately receive and send transactions. One of the most famous node aggregators is [MoneroWorld](https://moneroworld.com/#nodes).
- **Native public nodes**. This is one of the new coolest features the Monero devs came up with to improve the user experience and to make easier to connect to the network. The CLI wallet allow to make a node public by simply adding the flag `--public-node`. Doing so, it will be advertised on the P2P network and people will be able to connect to it (or to another public node advertising itself in the same way) using the related option in the GUI and CLI wallets.
Be aware that using public remote nodes can be risky. Node operators can link transactions to IP addresses. These risks can be mitigated, but you should always avoid using them if you have the possibility. Run your own node!
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -633,6 +633,7 @@ moneropedia:
paperwallet: Kâğıt Cüzdan
paymentid: Ödeme ID
pedersen-commitment: Pedersen Üstlenmesi
remote-node: Remote Node
reseed: Tekrar-tohum
ringCT: Halka CT
ringsignatures: Halka İmza
......
---
terms: ["remote-node", "remote-nodes"]
summary: "Nodes wich are not running in the same machine as the wallet. Open remote nodes allow to use the Monero network immediately"
---
A @node that doesn't run on the same local machine where the Monero @wallet is located is called "Remote Node" and can be private or open.
A **private remote node** doesn't run on your local machine, but you have full control over it. A classic example is a node running on a VPS or a server. That node is not on your local machine, but you have full control over it. You can even decide to make it become an open node, allowing people to connect to it.
An **Open remote node** can be used by people who, for their own reasons (usually because of hardware requirements, disk space, or technical abilities), cannot/don't want to run their own node and prefer to relay on one publicly available on the Monero network. Open remote nodes are often simply referred as "remote nodes".
Using an open node will allow to make a @transaction instantaneously, without the need to download the @blockchain and sync to the Monero network first, but at the cost of the control over your privacy. the Monero community suggests to always run your own node to obtain the maximum privacy possible and to help decentralize the network.
### Public Nodes
Open nodes are cool because, as we said above, allow people who are not running their own node to immediately join the Monero network. There are 2 main ways to connect to an open node: Simply get somebody to share with you their node, by asking them to "open it" and provide you with IP address and port, or use a public one.
Public nodes are reachable in the network using two systems:
- **Node aggregators**, which are basically lists of open remote nodes. The operators of those nodes decided to add them to the aggregator so that other people can use them. The aggregator will provide to the person who want to use a remote node a simple URL. This URL connects to one of the nodes in the list and will need to be inserted in the Monero wallet (GUI or CLI). The wallet will then contact one of the nodes provided by the URL and will allow the end user to immediately receive and send transactions. One of the most famous node aggregators is [MoneroWorld](https://moneroworld.com/#nodes).
- **Native public nodes**. This is one of the new coolest features the Monero devs came up with to improve the user experience and to make easier to connect to the network. The CLI wallet allow to make a node public by simply adding the flag `--public-node`. Doing so, it will be advertised on the P2P network and people will be able to connect to it (or to another public node advertising itself in the same way) using the related option in the GUI and CLI wallets.
Be aware that using public remote nodes can be risky. Node operators can link transactions to IP addresses. These risks can be mitigated, but you should always avoid using them if you have the possibility. Run your own node!
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -632,6 +632,7 @@ moneropedia:
paperwallet: 纸钱包
paymentid: 付款ID
pedersen-commitment: Pedersen Commitment
remote-node: Remote Node
reseed: Reseed
ringCT: 环交易
ringsignatures: 环签名
......
---
terms: ["remote-node", "remote-nodes"]
summary: "Nodes wich are not running in the same machine as the wallet. Open remote nodes allow to use the Monero network immediately"
---
A @node that doesn't run on the same local machine where the Monero @wallet is located is called "Remote Node" and can be private or open.
A **private remote node** doesn't run on your local machine, but you have full control over it. A classic example is a node running on a VPS or a server. That node is not on your local machine, but you have full control over it. You can even decide to make it become an open node, allowing people to connect to it.
An **Open remote node** can be used by people who, for their own reasons (usually because of hardware requirements, disk space, or technical abilities), cannot/don't want to run their own node and prefer to relay on one publicly available on the Monero network. Open remote nodes are often simply referred as "remote nodes".
Using an open node will allow to make a @transaction instantaneously, without the need to download the @blockchain and sync to the Monero network first, but at the cost of the control over your privacy. the Monero community suggests to always run your own node to obtain the maximum privacy possible and to help decentralize the network.
### Public Nodes
Open nodes are cool because, as we said above, allow people who are not running their own node to immediately join the Monero network. There are 2 main ways to connect to an open node: Simply get somebody to share with you their node, by asking them to "open it" and provide you with IP address and port, or use a public one.
Public nodes are reachable in the network using two systems:
- **Node aggregators**, which are basically lists of open remote nodes. The operators of those nodes decided to add them to the aggregator so that other people can use them. The aggregator will provide to the person who want to use a remote node a simple URL. This URL connects to one of the nodes in the list and will need to be inserted in the Monero wallet (GUI or CLI). The wallet will then contact one of the nodes provided by the URL and will allow the end user to immediately receive and send transactions. One of the most famous node aggregators is [MoneroWorld](https://moneroworld.com/#nodes).
- **Native public nodes**. This is one of the new coolest features the Monero devs came up with to improve the user experience and to make easier to connect to the network. The CLI wallet allow to make a node public by simply adding the flag `--public-node`. Doing so, it will be advertised on the P2P network and people will be able to connect to it (or to another public node advertising itself in the same way) using the related option in the GUI and CLI wallets.
Be aware that using public remote nodes can be risky. Node operators can link transactions to IP addresses. These risks can be mitigated, but you should always avoid using them if you have the possibility. Run your own node!
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -631,6 +631,7 @@ moneropedia:
paperwallet: Paper Wallet
paymentid: Payment ID
pedersen-commitment: Pedersen Commitment
remote-node: Remote Node
reseed: Reseed
ringCT: Ring CT
ringsignatures: Ring Signature
......
---
terms: ["remote-node", "remote-nodes"]
summary: "Nodes wich are not running in the same machine as the wallet. Open remote nodes allow to use the Monero network immediately"
---
A @node that doesn't run on the same local machine where the Monero @wallet is located is called "Remote Node" and can be private or open.
A **private remote node** doesn't run on your local machine, but you have full control over it. A classic example is a node running on a VPS or a server. That node is not on your local machine, but you have full control over it. You can even decide to make it become an open node, allowing people to connect to it.
An **Open remote node** can be used by people who, for their own reasons (usually because of hardware requirements, disk space, or technical abilities), cannot/don't want to run their own node and prefer to relay on one publicly available on the Monero network. Open remote nodes are often simply referred as "remote nodes".
Using an open node will allow to make a @transaction instantaneously, without the need to download the @blockchain and sync to the Monero network first, but at the cost of the control over your privacy. the Monero community suggests to always run your own node to obtain the maximum privacy possible and to help decentralize the network.
### Public Nodes
Open nodes are cool because, as we said above, allow people who are not running their own node to immediately join the Monero network. There are 2 main ways to connect to an open node: Simply get somebody to share with you their node, by asking them to "open it" and provide you with IP address and port, or use a public one.
Public nodes are reachable in the network using two systems:
- **Node aggregators**, which are basically lists of open remote nodes. The operators of those nodes decided to add them to the aggregator so that other people can use them. The aggregator will provide to the person who want to use a remote node a simple URL. This URL connects to one of the nodes in the list and will need to be inserted in the Monero wallet (GUI or CLI). The wallet will then contact one of the nodes provided by the URL and will allow the end user to immediately receive and send transactions. One of the most famous node aggregators is [MoneroWorld](https://moneroworld.com/#nodes).
- **Native public nodes**. This is one of the new coolest features the Monero devs came up with to improve the user experience and to make easier to connect to the network. The CLI wallet allow to make a node public by simply adding the flag `--public-node`. Doing so, it will be advertised on the P2P network and people will be able to connect to it (or to another public node advertising itself in the same way) using the related option in the GUI and CLI wallets.
Be aware that using public remote nodes can be risky. Node operators can link transactions to IP addresses. These risks can be mitigated, but you should always avoid using them if you have the possibility. Run your own node!
\ No newline at end of file
---
layout: moneropedia
title: titles.moneropedia
entry: moneropedia.entries.remote-node
---
@moneropedia_article
{% t global.lang_tag %}
{% tf resources/moneropedia/remote-node.md %}
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