Commit dec38ff3 authored by luigi1111's avatar luigi1111

Merge !963

German Translation - Monero Site - Ready for merge

See merge request monero-project/monero-site!963
parents 79c56b32 8d79f880
......@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ plugins:
- jekyll-multiple-languages-plugin
# jekyll-multiple-languages-plugin settings:
languages: ["en", "es", "it", "pl", "fr", "ar", "ru"]
languages: ["en", "es", "it", "pl", "fr", "ar", "ru", "de"]
exclude_from_localizations: ["img", "css", "fonts", "media", "404", "feed.xml", "404", "meta", "forum-funding-system", "_posts", "legal"]
......
- title: Ressourcen
subfolderitems:
- name: Über Monero
url: resources/about/
- name: Moneropedia
url: resources/moneropedia/
- name: Anleitungen für Entwickler
url: resources/developer-guides/
- name: Anleitungen für Nutzer
url: resources/user-guides/
- name: Bibliothek
url: library
- name: RSS-Feed
url: https://getmonero.org/feed.xml
- title: IRC-Channels
subfolderitems:
- name: monero
url: irc://chat.freenode.net/#monero
- name: monero-dev
url: irc://chat.freenode.net/#monero-dev
- name: monero-markets
url: irc://chat.freenode.net/#monero-markets
- name: monero-pools
url: irc://chat.freenode.net/#monero-pools
- name: monero-community
url: irc://chat.freenode.net/#monero-community
- name: monero-translations
url: irc://chat.freenode.net/#monero-translations
- name: monero-hardware
url: irc://chat.freenode.net/#monero-hardware
- title: Community
subfolderitems:
- name: Reddit
url: https://reddit.com/r/monero
- name: Stack Exchange
url: https://monero.stackexchange.com/
- name: Thread auf BitcoinTalk
url: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=583449.0
- name: Mattermost-Chat
url: https://mattermost.getmonero.org/
- name: Telegram-Chat
url: https://telegram.me/bitmonero
- title: Das Monero-Projekt
subfolderitems:
- name: OpenAlias
url: https://openalias.org/
- name: Kovri
url: https://kovri.io/
- name: Monero Research Lab
url: resources/research-lab/
- name: Monero-Presseunterlagen
url: press-kit
- name: Rechtliches
url: legal
- name: Quellcode
url: https://github.com/monero-project
- name: Technische Spezifikationen
url: technical-specs/
- title: Einstieg
subfolderitems:
- page: Was ist Monero?
url: get-started/what-is-monero
- page: Nutzen
url: get-started/using
- page: Akzeptieren
url: get-started/accepting
- page: Unterstützen
url: get-started/contributing
- page: Mining
url: get-started/mining
- page: Häufig gestellte Fragen
url: get-started/faq
- title: Downloads
url: downloads/
- title: Neuigkeiten
subfolderitems:
- page: Alle Einträge
url: blog
- page: Ankündigungen
url: blog/tags/monero%20missives.html
- page: Protokolle
url: blog/tags/dev%20diaries.html
- page: Versionen
url: blog/tags/releases.html
- title: Community
subfolderitems:
- page: Team
url: community/team
- page: Hangouts
url: community/hangouts
- page: Sponsoren
url: community/sponsorships
- page: Händler
url: community/merchants
- title: Ressourcen
subfolderitems:
- page: Über
url: resources/about
- page: Roadmap
url: resources/roadmap
- page: Research Lab
url: resources/research-lab
- page: Moneropedia
url: resources/moneropedia
- page: Anleitungen für Nutzer
url: resources/user-guides
- page: Anleitungen für Entwickler
url: resources/developer-guides
- page: Technische Spezifikationen
url: technical-specs
- page: Bibliothek
url: library
- year: 2014
accomplishments:
- name: Veröffentlicht auf Bitcointalk
date: 2014-04-18
status: completed
- name: Umbenennung von Bitmonero zu Monero
date: 2014-04-23
status: completed
- name: Erholung von einer Spamattacke
date: 2014-09-04
status: completed
- name: „Monero Research Lab“-Papers 1 und 2 veröffentlicht
date: 2014-09-12
status: completed
- name: „Monero Research Lab“-Paper 3 veröffentlicht
date: 2014-09-25
status: completed
- name: 0.8.8.6 veröffentlicht
date: 2014-12-08
status: completed
- year: 2015
accomplishments:
- name: „Monero Research Lab“-Paper 4 veröffentlicht
date: 2015-01-26
status: completed
- year: 2016
accomplishments:
- name: 0.9.0 Hydrogen Helix veröffentlicht
date: 2016-01-01
status: completed
- name: „Monero Research Lab“-Paper 5 veröffentlicht
date: 2016-02-10
status: completed
- name: Netzwerkupgrade, das eine minimale Ringgröße von 3 für alle Transaktionen voraussetzt
date: 2016-03-22
status: completed
- name: 0.10.0 Wolfram Warptangent veröffentlicht
date: 2016-09-18
status: completed
- name: Netzwerkupgrade um ungleiche Transaktionsbeträge unter den Ringen zu ermöglichen
date: 2016-09-21
status: completed
- name: 0.10.1 Wolfram Warptangent veröffentlicht
date: 2016-12-14
status: completed
- name: Offizielle GUI Beta 1 veröffentlicht
date: 2016-12-22
status: completed
- year: 2017
accomplishments:
- name: Netzwerkupgrade, um RingCT Transaktionen zu ermöglichen
date: 2017-01-05
status: completed
- name: 0.10.2 veröffentlicht; kritische Schwachstelle gepatcht
date: 2017-02-22
status: completed
- name: 0.10.3.1 Wolfram Warptangent veröffentlicht
date: 2017-03-27
status: completed
- name: Netzwerkupgrade, das die kleinstmögliche Blockgröße und den dynamischen Gebührenalgorithmus anpasst
date: 2017-04-15
status: completed
- name: Webseite neu gestaltet
date: 2017-07-04
status: completed
- name: 0.11.0.0 Helium Hydra veröffentlicht
date: 2017-09-07
status: completed
- name: Fluffy-Blocks
date: 2017-09-07
status: completed
- name: Betaphase der GUI beendet
date: 2017-09-10
status: completed
- name: Netzwerkupgrade, das die minimale Ringgröße auf 5 anhebt und RingCT voraussetzt
date: 2017-09-15
status: completed
- name: 0MQ/ZeroMQ
date: September, 2017
status: completed
- name: Subadressen
date: October, 2017
status: completed
- name: Mehrfachsignaturen (multisig)
date: December, 2017
status: completed
- year: 2018
accomplishments:
- name: Neuer PoW CryptoNoteV7
date: 2018-04-06
status: completed
- name: Netzwerkupgrade, das die minimale Ringgröße auf 7 erhöht, Mehrfachsignaturen und Subadressen integriert und den PoW-Algorithmus ändert
date: 2018-04-06
status: completed
- name: "Getmonero.org: Übersetzungen in Französisch und Polnisch"
date: 2018-04-24
status: completed
- name: Hardware-Wallets von Ledger werden unterstützt
date: 2018-06-04
status: completed
- name: Kovri Alpha veröffentlicht
date: 2018-08-01
status: completed
- name: Forum-Finanzierungs-System neu gestaltet
date:
status: ongoing
- name: Implementation von BulletProofs anstelle von RingCT, um Transaktionsgrößen zu verringern
date:
status: ongoing
- name: Kovri Beta
date:
status: upcoming
- year: 2019
accomplishments:
- name: Zweitschichtlösungen für bessere Geschwindigkeit und Skalierbarkeit
date:
status: upcoming
- name: Weitere „Monero Research Lab“-Papers
date:
status: upcoming
......@@ -6,6 +6,7 @@ langs:
fr: Français
ar: Arabic
ru: Русский
de: Deutsch
global:
date: '%Y/%m/%d'
......
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---
terms: ["", ""]
summary: ""
---
{% include untranslated.html %}
### The Basics
<Re-write summary here>
\ No newline at end of file
---
terms: ["account", "accounts", "wallet", "wallets", "Account", "Accounts"]
summary: "similar in function to a bank account, contains all of your sent and received transactions"
---
{% include untranslated.html %}
### The Basics
Those familiar with Monero's predecessors will be more familiar with the term *wallet* to describe this. In Monero we call this an account, and it is a private account owned and operated by a Monero user.
Your account contains all of the Monero @transactions you have sent and received. Your account balance is a sum of all the Monero you've received, less the Monero you've sent. When using Monero you may notice that your account has two balances, a locked and an unlocked balance. The unlocked balance contains funds that can be spent immediately, and the locked balance contains funds that you can't spend right now. You may receive a transaction that has an @unlock-time set, or you may have sent some Monero and are waiting for the @change to come back to your wallet, both situations that could lead to those funds being locked for a time.
A key difference between traditional electronic currency and Monero is that your account resides only under your control, normally on your computer, and cannot be accessed by anyone else if you [practice good security](#practicing-good-security).
### Multiple Accounts
There are no costs attached to creating a Monero account, and there are no fees charged except for individual @transaction fees that go to @miners.
This means that individuals can easily create a Monero account for themselves as well as a joint account to share with their partner, and individual accounts for their children. Similarly, a business could create separate accounts for each division or group. Since Monero's @transaction fees are quite low, moving funds between accounts is not an expensive exercise.
### Cryptographic Keys
Monero relies heavily on a cryptography principle known as *public/private key cryptography* or *asymmetric cryptography*, which is thoroughly detailed in [this Wikipedia article](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public-key_cryptography).
Your account is based on two keys, a @spend-key and a @view-key. The @spend-key is special in that it is the single key required to spend your Monero funds, whereas the @view-key allows you to reveal your @transactions to a third party, for example for auditing or accounting purposes. These keys in your account also play an important role in Monero's @transaction's privacy.
The private keys for both of these must be protected by you in order to retain your account privacy. On the other hand, the public keys are obviously public (they are part of your Monero account address). For normal public/private key cryptography someone could send you a private message by encrypting it with either of your public keys, and you would then be the only one able to decrypt it with your private keys.
### Backing Up Your Account
When you manage your own Monero Account with the private @spend-key, you are solely responsible for the security of your funds. Thankfully, Monero makes it very easy to backup your account. When creating a Monero account for the first time you will be given a unique @mnemonic-seed for your account that consists of 13 or 25 words in the language of your choosing. **This seed is the only thing you need to backup for your account**, and so it is imperative that it is written down and stored securely. Never store this seed in a form or location that would allow someone else to see it!
```
List of available languages for your wallet's seed:
0 : Deutsch
1 : English
2 : Español
3 : Français
4 : Italiano
5 : Nederlands
6 : Português
7 : русский язык
8 : 日本語
9 : 简体中文 (中国)
10 : Esperanto
Enter the number corresponding to the language of your choice: 1
Generated new wallet: 4B15ZjveuttEaTmfZjLVioPVw7bfSmRLpSgB33CJbuC6BoGtZrug9TDAmhZEWD6XoFDGz55bgzisT9Dnv61sbsA6Sa47TYu
view key: 4130fa26463d9451781771a8baa5d0b8085c47c4500cefe4746bab48f1d15903
**********************************************************************
Your wallet has been generated.
To start synchronizing with the daemon, use "refresh" command.
Use "help" command to see the list of available commands.
Always use "exit" command when closing monero-wallet-cli to save your
current session's state. Otherwise, you might need to synchronize
your wallet again (your wallet keys are NOT at risk in any case).
PLEASE NOTE: the following 25 words can be used to recover access to your wallet. Please write them down and store them somewhere safe and secure. Please do not store them in your email or on file storage services outside of your immediate control.
aunt knuckle italics moisture hawk thorn iris abort
chlorine smog uphill glass aptitude nowhere sewage plywood
dual relic fierce divers anvil nodes bubble cabin abort
**********************************************************************
Starting refresh...
Refresh done, blocks received: 21939
Balance: 0.000000000000, unlocked balance: 0.000000000000
Background refresh thread started
[wallet 4B15Zj]: █
```
As the example above indicates, it is incredibly important to store these words in safe locations. If you are concerned about the risk of critical loss at your home, for instance, you may want to store a second copy of your seed with your attorney or in a safety deposit box. It is also recommended that it is stored in a way that does not make it obvious that it is your seed, so writing it into a letter or as part of other notes is advisable.
### Practicing Good Security
Over and above backing up your @mnemonic-seed so that you have access to your account in the event of critical data loss, it is also important to practice good security. Use a secure password when creating a local Monero account (not used on [MyMonero](https://mymonero.com) or other web-based account systems).
Don't ever give your Monero account password to anyone, as this can be used to access the Monero on your computer without knowing your @mnemonic-seed. Similarly, make sure you have running and up-to-date antivirus, especially on Windows computers. Finally, be careful when clicking links in emails or on unknown and untrusted websites, as malware installed on your computer can sit and wait for you to access your Monero account before taking the funds from it.
### Leaving Your Account to Next of Kin
Providing access to your Monero account to your next of kin is just as easy as it is to backup your Monero account. Simply leave your @mnemonic-seed to them in your will, or store it somewhere safe where it will be given to them upon the execution of your will. A key advantage to this is that your next of kin won't have to wait for months for a third party to release the funds to them.
---
tags: ["kovri"]
terms: ["Address-Book"]
summary: "Allows you to visit I2P websites/services that have the .i2p domain"
---
{% include untranslated.html %}
### The Basics
In order to browse @I2P sites or services with @Kovri, you'll need an address book. An address book will allow you to translate @I2P websites/services that use the `.i2p` [top-level domain](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top_level_domain) into an address that @I2P network will understand.
Without an address book, you would be stuck using a @base32-address every time you visit an @I2P website/service - and that's not fun!
### In-depth information
Since [DNS](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNS) does not exist on the @I2P network, @Kovri also does **not** use DNS or any sort of @canonically-unique-host resolution. Instead, Kovri pairs a @locally-unique-host to a @base64-address @destination in a @subscription. Once your address book is filled with a @subscription, you can resolve your favorite `.i2p` domain site into a usable @I2P destination.
### Creating an Address Book
By default, your installation will come with a default public @subscription called `hosts.txt` in your @data-directory. When @Kovri starts, it loads this subscription and fetches any other subscriptions you've specified. Once loaded, your address book will be appropriately filled. For details on how to manage subscriptions, see @subscription.
### Updating the Address Book
Currently, there are several ways to update your address book:
1. Use a @jump-service to insert I2P addresses into your address book
2. Use a @jump-service to copy/paste an address into your private @subscription
3. Manually add or subtract from a private @subscription
**Note: Kovri is in heavy development. In the future there *will* be easier ways to update the address book**
### Address Book / Naming specification
For specification details and more, visit the [Address Book and Naming Specification](https://geti2p.net/en/docs/naming)
---
terms: ["address", "addresses", "Adresse" , "Adressen"]
summary: "either an alias, such as donate.getmonero.org, or a set of 95 characters starting with a 4"
---
{% include untranslated.html %}
### The Basics
When you send Monero to someone you only need one piece of information, and that is their Monero address. A *raw* Monero address is a set of 95 characters starting with a '4'. The Monero donation address, for instance, is <span class="long-term">44AFFq5kSiGBoZ4NMDwYtN18obc8AemS33DBLWs3H7otXft3XjrpDtQGv7SqSsaBYBb98uNbr2VBBEt7f2wfn3RVGQBEP3A</span>.
Because those addresses are long and complex, you will often encounter an @OpenAlias address instead. For example, Monero donations can be sent to <span class="long-term">[email protected]</span> or <span class="long-term">donate.getmonero.org</span>.
If you would like to get an @OpenAlias address of your own then there is some information on the [OpenAlias page](/resources/openalias).
### Integrated address
An integrated address is an address combined with an encrypted 64-bit @payment-ID. A raw integrated address is 106 characters long.
### In-depth Information
The address is actually the concatenation, in Base58 format, of the *public* @spend-key and the *public* @view-key, prefixed with the network byte (the number 18 for Monero) and suffixed with the first four bytes of the Keccac-256 hash of the whole string (used as a checksum).
---
terms: ["airgap"]
summary: "An airgap is a security measure to physically separate a computer or device from all other networks, such as the Internet."
---
{% include untranslated.html %}
### The Basics
"An air gap, air wall or air gapping is a network security measure employed on one or more computers to ensure that a secure computer network is physically isolated from unsecured networks, such as the public Internet or an unsecured local area network.[2] The name arises from the technique of creating a network that is physically separated (with a conceptual air gap) from all other networks. The air gap may not be completely literal, as networks employing the use of dedicated cryptographic devices that can tunnel packets over untrusted networks while avoiding packet rate or size variation can be considered air gapped, as there is no ability for computers on opposite sides of the gap to communicate."
Taken from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_gap_(networking)
---
terms: ["atomic-units", "atomic-unit"]
summary: "Atomic Units refer to the smallest fraction of 1 XMR."
---
{% include untranslated.html %}
### The Basics
Atomic Units refer to the smallest fraction of 1 XMR.
One atomic unit is currently 1e-12 XMR (0.000000000001 XMR, or one @piconero).
It may be changed in the future.
---
tags: ["kovri"]
terms: ["Base32-address", "Base32-addresses"]
summary: "Base32 encoded hash of a Base64 address"
---
{% include untranslated.html %}
### The Basics
A Base32 address is a shortened, encoded version of an @I2P address. The Base32 address is the first part in a `.b32.i2p` hostname.
Example:
`i35yftyyb22xhcvghmev46t5knefur5v66qzekkajatwfwhyklvq.b32.i2p`
where
`i35yftyyb22xhcvghmev46t5knefur5v66qzekkajatwfwhyklvq` is the Base32 address.
### In-depth Information
Ultimately, a Base32 address is a 52 character [Base32 encoded representation](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Base32) of the full SHA-256 hash of an @I2P @base64-address.
### Notes
**Note: `.b32` is not a sub-domain of `.i2p`**
---
tags: ["kovri"]
terms: ["Base64-address", "Base64-addresses"]
summary: "Base64 encoded I2P destination"
---
{% include untranslated.html %}
### The Basics
A @base64-address is a 516-character [Base64 encoded](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Base64) @I2P @destination. @base64-addresses are primarily used for @address-book, @jump-service, and also internally.
Example:
```
AQZGLAMpI9Q0l0kmMj1vpJJYK3CjLp~fE3MfvE-e7KMKjI5cPOH6EN8m794uHJ6b09qM8mb9VEv1lVLEov~usVliTSXCSHuRBOCIwIOuDNU0AbVa4BpIx~2sU4TxKhoaA3zQ6VzINoduTdR2IJhPvI5xzezp7dR21CEQGGTbenDslXeQ4iLHFA2~bzp1f7etSl9T2W9RID-KH78sRQmzWnv7dbhNodMbpO6xsf1vENf6bMRzqD5vgHEHZu2aSoNuPyYxDU1eM6--61b2xp9mt1k3ud-5WvPVg89RaU9ugU5cxaHgR927lHMCAEU2Ax~zUb3DbrvgQBOTHnJEx2Fp7pOK~PnP6ylkYKQMfLROosLDXinxOoSKP0UYCh2WgIUPwE7WzJH3PiJVF0~WZ1dZ9mg00c~gzLgmkOxe1NpFRNg6XzoARivNVB5NuWqNxr5WKWMLBGQ9YHvHO1OHhUJTowb9X90BhtHnLK2AHwO6fV-iHWxRJyDabhSMj1kuYpVUBQAEAAcAAA==
```
### In-depth Information
See @destination for details behind @base64-address
---
terms: ["block", "blocks"]
summary: "a container of transactions, a sequence of which forms a blockchain"
---
{% include untranslated.html %}
### The Basics
A block is a container of @transactions, with a new block being added to the @blockchain once every 2 minutes (see constant `DIFFICULTY_TARGET_V2` defined as 120 seconds), on average.
Blocks also contain a special type of transaction, the @coinbase-transaction, which add newly created Monero to the network.
Blocks are created through the process of @mining, and the @node that successfully mines the block then broadcasts it to each of the @nodes connected to it, who subsequently re-broadcast the block until the entire Monero network has received it.
Fake or bad blocks generally cannot be created, as @nodes that receive blocks always verify the @transactions they contain against a set of consensus rules that all nodes adhere to, including validating the cryptographic @signatures on each transaction.
---
terms: ["blockchain", "blockchains"]
summary: "a distributed ledger of all transactions both past and present, without revealing who the funds came from or went to"
---
{% include untranslated.html %}
### The Basics
A @blockchain is a distributed database that continuously grows with a record of all of the transactions that have occurred with a given cryptocurrency. This database is often referred to as a ledger because the data contains a large list of transactions that have taken place. In Monero, these transactions are packaged together into 'blocks' every 2 minutes (on average), and all miners and nodes on the network have copies of these blocks.
### Monero's @Blockchain
Unlike Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, transactions in the Monero @blockchain do not reveal where funds came from or went to, providing anonymity and making the currency completely @fungible. Additionally, the amounts of all transactions are hidden by @RingCT, a feature of Monero. For auditing or other transparency purposes a user can share a @view-key to prove they control certain amounts of Moneroj.
---
terms: ["bootstrap-node", "bootstrap-nodes"]
summary: "A node to which a daemon connects to give immediate usability to wallets while syncing"
---
{% include untranslated.html %}
### The Basics
The daemon running on a local @node has to sync with other (remote) @nodes. While it is not fully synced, @wallet may still be connected to the local node. Therefore, the @wallet cannot access the @blocks that are bot yet synced on the local @node.
To allow the @wallet to be immediately usable, the daemon on the local @node uses a bootstrap node to which the RPC request are proxying to, giving access to the missing @blocks.
Note: the replies from the bootstrap node may be untrustworthy.
---
tags: ["kovri"]
terms: ["Canonically-unique-host"]
summary: "A host that is canonically resolved to an address or set of addresses"
---
{% include untranslated.html %}
### The Basics
A Canonically-unique host is a [FQDN](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FQDN) that will canonically resolve to a designated address or set of addresses. Not to be confused with a @locally-unique-host.
### In-depth information
A Canonically-unique host is defined by remote authoritative sources; usually through [DNS](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNS). When resolving a peer's hostname, you will most likely use an external source for resolution unless you have the following implemented:
- a database file similar to a [hosts file](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hosts_(file))
- an internal-network resolver (which eventually pulls from external sources)
### Notes
- Monero primarily uses @canonically-unique-host resolution while @I2P only uses @locally-unique-host resolution.
- @I2P's and @Kovri's self-assigned top-level domain is currently `.i2p` and @Kovri intends to only process/use the `.i2p` [top-level domain](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top_level_domain)
---
terms: ["change"]
summary: "Monero sent as part of a transaction, that returns to your account instead of going to another recipient"
---
{% include untranslated.html %}
### The Basics
Monero sent as part of a transaction, that returns to your account instead of going to another recipient.
### More Information
The @wallet in the Monero software makes change automatically, but when you send a transaction, you are taking an input that you control and telling the Monero network what to do with it. The input is a "deposit" to your account that you are able to spend. Outputs are the part of the transaction that tells the Monero network where to send the funds.
You might have multiple inputs in your account, in many different denominations (For example: you deposited 0.5 XMR on Friday, and 0.75 XMR on Saturday). So, when have a transaction with an input of 0.5 XMR, but you only want to send 0.1 XMR, your transaction will include a fee to pay the @miner, an output for 0.1 XMR to send to the recipient, and the rest that you want to send back to yourself will be an output back to you (this is called "change"). Once the transaction is completed, the change becomes available to you as an input that you can again split and send with a new transaction.
---
tags: ["kovri"]
terms: ["Clearnet"]
summary: "The Internet in which anonymous overlay networks are built upon"
---
{% include untranslated.html %}
### The Basics
When you use the Internet for things like news, email, social media, and even Monero, you are most likely using a clearnet connection. This means that *all* of your connections can be tracked, traced, and monitored by:
- your [ISP](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISP)
- the website/service/person you're communicating with
- possibly a [Five Eyes](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5_Eyes) capable entity
and even if you use [HTTPS](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTPS) or similar (which *encrypts* your transmission), your route is not hidden nor is it anonymous, thus; it is in the *clear*.
### In-depth information
Since a traditional [VPN](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VPN) cannot save you from clearnet (as you are still using *clearnet* (though you are more proxied than without a VPN)), you should use an *anonymous overlay network* to avoid using clearnet directly:
- @Kovri
- @Java-I2P
- [Tor](https://torproject.org/)
These technologies protect you from clearnet by building an anonymous network **over** clearnet to keep your transmissions both encrypted **and** anonymous.
Here is an accurate, [interactive diagram](https://www.eff.org/pages/tor-and-https) provided by the [EFF](https://www.eff.org/) which describes *clearnet* as it relates to **Tor**. The concept also (somewhat) applies to @Kovri and @I2P in terms of anonymity with the exception that:
- @Kovri does not use exit nodes when connecting to an @eepsite
- Your traffic never need to leave the @I2P network
- You do not need HTTPS to use @Kovri (with the exception of @reseed)