Unverified Commit 6dd55c9c authored by luigi1111's avatar luigi1111 Committed by GitHub
Browse files

Merge pull request #794 from el00ruobuob/Moneropedia-localized

Moneropedia localization
parents 20512711 4c1e8dd8
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Locally-unique host"
tags: ["kovri"]
terms: ["Locally-unique-host"]
......
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Message"
tags: ["kovri"]
terms: ["Message", "Messages"]
......
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Mining"
terms: ["mining", "miner", "miners"]
summary: "the process of cryptographically computing a mathematical proof for a block, containing a number of transactions, which is then added to the blockchain"
......@@ -7,14 +6,10 @@ summary: "the process of cryptographically computing a mathematical proof for a
### The Basics
Mining is the distributed process of confirming transactions on the public ledger of all transactions, aka @blockchain. Monero nodes use the block chain to distinguish legitimate transactions from attempts to re-spend coins that have already been spent elsewhere.
The process of cryptographically computing a mathematical proof for a block, containing a number of transactions, which is then added to the blockchain.
Monero is powered strictly by Proof of Work. It employs a mining algorithm that has the potential to be efficiently tasked to billions of existing devices (any modern x86 CPU and many GPU's). Monero uses the @CryptoNight Proof of Work (@PoW) algorithm, which is designed for use in ordinary CPUs and GPUs.
Mining is the distributed process of confirming transactions on the public ledger of all transactions, aka @blockchain. Monero nodes use the blockchain to distinguish legitimate transactions from attempts to re-spend coins that have already been spent elsewhere.
The smart mining feature allows transparent CPU mining on the user's computer, far from the de facto centralization of mining farms and pool mining, pursuing Satoshi Nakamoto's original vision of a true P2P currency.
Monero is powered strictly by Proof of Work. It employs a mining algorithm that has the potential to be efficiently tasked to billions of existing devices (any modern x86 CPU and many GPUs). Monero uses a variant of CryptoNight Proof of Work (PoW) algorithm, which is designed for use in ordinary CPUs and GPUs.
As of June 2017, botnets made of hacked computers account for a not-insignificant portion of the miners on the Monero network. This is due to the profitability of mining on CPUs via the @CryptoNight algorithm.
{{ page.summary | capitalize }}.
The smart mining feature allows transparent CPU mining on the user's computer, far from the de facto centralization of mining farms and pool mining, pursuing Satoshi Nakamoto's original vision of a true P2P currency.
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Mnemonic Seed"
terms: ["mnemonic-seed", "mnemonic"]
summary: "a 13 or 25 word phrase used to backup a Monero account, available in a number of languages"
......@@ -7,7 +6,7 @@ summary: "a 13 or 25 word phrase used to backup a Monero account, available in a
### The Basics
{{ page.summary | capitalize }}. This 25-word phrase (13 words in the case of MyMonero) has all the information needed to view and spend funds from a Monero @account.
A 13 or 25 word phrase used to backup a Monero account, available in a number of languages. This 25-word phrase (13 words in the case of MyMonero) has all the information needed to view and spend funds from a Monero @account.
### In-depth Information
......
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Network Database"
tags: ["kovri"]
terms: ["Network-Database"]
......
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Node"
terms: ["node", "nodes", "full-node", "full-nodes"]
summary: "a device on the Internet running the Monero software, with a full copy of the Monero blockchain, actively assisting the Monero network"
......@@ -7,17 +6,17 @@ summary: "a device on the Internet running the Monero software, with a full copy
### The Basics
{{ page.summary | capitalize }}.
A device on the Internet running the Monero software, with a full copy of the Monero blockchain, actively assisting the Monero network.
### More Information
Nodes participate in the Monero network and secure @transactions by enforcing the rules of the network. Nodes download the entire @blockchain to know what transactions have taken place. Nodes assist the network by relaying transactions to other nodes on the network. Nodes may also choose contribute to the Monero network by participating in crafting @blocks (this is called @mining).
Nodes participate in the Monero network and secure @transactions by enforcing the rules of the network. Nodes download the entire @blockchain to know what transactions have taken place. Nodes assist the network by relaying transactions to other nodes on the network. Nodes may also choose to contribute to the Monero network by participating in crafting @blocks (this is called @mining).
Mining is the process by which nodes create a block from the previously accepted block, transactions that are waiting to be processed in the @tx-pool, and the @coinbase. When a node believes it has crafted a valid block it will transmit the completed block to other nodes on the network and those nodes signal agreement by working on the next block in the chain.
Mining is the process by which nodes create a block from the previously accepted block, transactions that are waiting to be processed in the transaction pool, and the @coinbase-transaction. When a node believes it has crafted a valid block it will transmit the completed block to other nodes on the network and those nodes signal agreement by working on the next block in the chain.
The rules that nodes follow are built into the Monero software; When all nodes agree about the rules to follow this is called @consensus). Consensus is necessary for a cryptocurrency because it is how the blockchain is built; If nodes don't agree about which blocks are valid, for example people who have not updated their Monero software, those nodes that don't agree will no longer be able to participate in the Monero network.
The rules that nodes follow are built into the Monero software; When all nodes agree about the rules to follow this is called @consensus. Consensus is necessary for a cryptocurrency because it is how the blockchain is built; If nodes don't agree about which blocks are valid, for example people who have not updated their Monero software, those nodes that don't agree will no longer be able to participate in the Monero network.
The Monero Core Team plans for a @hardforks every 6 months, to occur in September and March of each year. At that time, if you are running a node it must be updated to the most recent version of the Monero software or it will no longer be able to participate in the network.
The Monero Core Team plans for a hardfork every 6 months, to occur in September and March of each year. At that time, if you are running a node it must be updated to the most recent version of the Monero software or it will no longer be able to participate in the network.
---
......
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "NTCP"
tags: ["kovri"]
terms: ["NTCP"]
......
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "OpenAlias"
terms: ["OpenAlias"]
summary: "a standard that allows you to use an email or domain syntax to pay someone instead of an address, eg. [email protected] or donate.getmonero.org"
......@@ -15,6 +14,6 @@ As part of the ongoing development of the Monero cryptocurrency project, we aske
At its most basic, OpenAlias is a TXT DNS record on a FQDN (fully qualified domain name). By combining this with DNS-related technologies we have created an aliasing standard that is extensible for developers, intuitive and familiar for users, and can interoperate with both centralized and decentralized domain systems.
{{ page.summary | capitalize }}.
A standard that allows you to use an email or domain syntax to pay someone instead of an address, eg. [email protected] or donate.getmonero.org.
More information can be found on the [OpenAlias page](/knowledge-base/openalias) or on the [OpenAlias website](https://openalias.org)
More information can be found on the [OpenAlias page](/resources/openalias) or on the [OpenAlias website](https://openalias.org)
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Paper Wallet"
terms: ["paperwallet", "paperwallets", "paper-wallet", "paper-wallets"]
summary: "A paper wallet stores the information necessary to send and receive Monero"
---
### The Basics
A paper wallet stores the information necessary to send and receive Monero.
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Payment ID"
terms: ["payment-ID", "payment-IDs"]
summary: "an optional flag that is added to identify transactions to merchants, consisting of 64 hexadecimal characters"
......@@ -11,15 +10,17 @@ Payment ID is an **arbitrary** and **optional** transaction attachment that cons
The Payment ID is usually used to identify transactions to merchants and exchanges: Given the intrinsic privacy features built into Monero, where a single public address is usually used for incoming transactions, the Payment ID is especially useful to tie incoming payments with user accounts.
### Compact Payment ID's and Integrated Addresses
### Compact Payment IDs and Integrated Addresses
Since the 0.9 Hydrogen Helix version, the Payment IDs can be encrypted and embedded in a payment address. The payment ID's of this type should be 64-bits and are encrypted with a random one-time key known only to the sender and receiver.
Since the 0.9 Hydrogen Helix version, Payment IDs can be encrypted and embedded in a payment address. The Payment IDs of this type should be 64-bits and are encrypted with a random one-time key known only to the sender and receiver.
### Creating a Payment ID
It is recommended to use the official wallet's `integrated_address` command to automatically generate Integrated Addresses that contain Compact Payment ID's. If you want to use the command line, you can generate Payment ID's as follows:
It is recommended to use the official wallet's `integrated_address` command to automatically generate Integrated Addresses that contain Compact Payment IDs. If you want to use the command line, you can generate Payment IDs as follows:
Creating a compact Payment ID for an Integrated Address:
```# openssl rand -hex 8```
Creating an old-style Payment ID:
```# openssl rand -hex 32```
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Pedersen Commitment"
terms: ["commitments", "commitment", "pedersen"]
summary: "Pedersen commitments are cryptographic algorythms that allow a prover to commit to a certain value without revealing it or being able to change it."
summary: "Pedersen commitments are cryptographic algorythms that allow a prover to commit to a certain value without revealing it or being able to change it"
---
### The Basics
Pedersen commitments are cryptographic algorythms that allow a prover to commit to a certain value without revealing it or being able to change it.
When you spend Monero, the value of the inputs that you are spending and the value of the outputs you are sending are encrypted and opaque to everyone except the recipient of each of those outputs. Pedersen commitments allow you to send Monero without revealing the value of the transactions. Pedersen commitments also make it possible for people to verify that transactions on the blockchain are valid and not creating Monero out of thin air.
### What It Means
......@@ -15,10 +16,8 @@ As long as the encrypted output amounts created, which include an output for the
Pedersen commitments mean that the sums can be verified as being equal, but the Monero value of each of the sums and the Monero value of the inputs and outputs individually are undeterminable. Pedersen commitments also mean that even the ratio of one input to another, or one output to another is undeterminable.
Even though it's unclear which inputs are really being spent (the ring signature lists both the real inputs being spent and decoy inputs therefore you don't actually know which input Pedersen commitments you need to sum) that's okay, because the RingCT ring signature only has to prove is that for one combination of the inputs the outputs are equal to the sum of the inputs. For mathematical reasons, this is impossible to forge.
It is unclear which inputs are really being spent as the ring signature lists both the real inputs being spent and decoy inputs, therefore you don't actually know which input Pedersen commitments need to be summed. That's okay, because the @RingCT ring signature only has to prove that for one combination of the inputs the outputs are equal to the sum of the inputs. For mathematical reasons, this is impossible to forge.
### In-depth Information
See information in [Ring Confidential Transactions paper](https://eprint.iacr.org/2015/1098.pdf) by Shen Noether of the Monero Research Lab.
{{ page.summary | capitalize }}.
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Reseed"
tags: ["kovri"]
terms: ["Reseed"]
......
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Ring Size"
terms: ["ring-size"]
summary: "total number of possible signers in a ring signature"
......
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Ring CT"
terms: ["ringCT", "ring-CT"]
summary: "a way to hide the amount sent in a Monero transaction"
---
### The Basics
RingCT, short for Ring Confidential Transactions, is how transaction amounts are hidden in Monero.
RingCT, short for Ring Confidential Transactions, is how transaction amounts are hidden in Monero.
Ring CT was implemented in block #1220516 in January 2017. After September 2017, this feature became mandatory for all transactions on the network.
RingCT introduces an improved version of @ring-signatures called A Multi-layered Linkable Spontaneous Anonymous Group signature, which allows for hidden amounts, origins and destinations of transactions with reasonable efficiency and verifiable, trustless coin generation.
RingCT introduces an improved version of @ring-signatures called "A Multi-layered Linkable Spontaneous Anonymous Group signature", which allows for hidden amounts, origins and destinations of transactions with reasonable efficiency and verifiable, trustless coin generation.
For more information, please read the creator Shen Noether's paper [here](https://eprint.iacr.org/2015/1098).
{{ page.summary | capitalize }}.
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Ring Signature"
terms: ["ring-signature", "ring-signatures"]
summary: "a group of cryptographic signatures with at least one real participant, but no way to tell which in the group is the real one as they all appear valid"
......@@ -13,6 +12,6 @@ For instance, a ring signature could be used to provide an anonymous signature f
### Application to Monero
A ring signature makes use of your @account keys and a number of public keys (also known as outputs) pulled from the @blockchain using a triangular distribution method. Over the course of time, past outputs could be used multiple times to form possible signer participants. In a "ring" of possible signers, all ring members are equal and valid. There is no way an outside observer can tell which of the possible signers in a signature group belongs to your @account. So, ring signatures ensure that transaction outputs are untraceable. Moreover, there are no fungibility issues with Monero given that every transaction output has plausible deniability (e.g. the network can not tell which outputs are spent or unspent).
A ring signature makes use of your @account keys and a number of public keys (also known as outputs) pulled from the @blockchain using a triangular distribution method. Over the course of time, past outputs could be used multiple times to form possible signer participants. In a "ring" of possible signers, all ring members are equal and valid. There is no way an outside observer can tell which of the possible signers in a signature group belongs to your @account. So, ring signatures ensure that transaction outputs are untraceable. Moreover, there are no @fungibility issues with Monero given that every transaction output has plausible deniability (e.g. the network can not tell which outputs are spent or unspent).
To read how Monero gives you privacy by default (unlinkability), see @stealth-addresses.
\ No newline at end of file
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Router-Info"
tags: ["kovri"]
terms: ["Router-Info", "Router-infos"]
......
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Scalability"
terms: ["scalability"]
summary: "Growth potential of Monero, resources required, and methods of increasing efficiency"
......
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Cryptographic Signature"
terms: ["signature", "signatures"]
summary: "a cryptographic method for proving ownership of a piece of information, as well as proving that the information has not been modified after being signed"
......@@ -7,4 +6,4 @@ summary: "a cryptographic method for proving ownership of a piece of information
### The Basics
{{ page.summary | capitalize }}.
\ No newline at end of file
A cryptographic method for proving ownership of a piece of information, as well as proving that the information has not been modified after being signed.
\ No newline at end of file
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Smart Mining"
terms: ["smart-mining"]
summary: "a process of having a throttled miner mine when it otherwise does not cause drawbacks"
......@@ -7,11 +6,9 @@ summary: "a process of having a throttled miner mine when it otherwise does not
### The Basics
Smart mining is the process of having a throttled miner mine when it otherwise does not cause drawbacks.
Smart mining is the process of having a throttled @miner mine when it otherwise does not cause drawbacks.
Drawbacks include increases heat, slower machine, depleting battery, etc. The intent of smart mining is to increase network security by allowing as many people as possible to let the smart miner on all the time. For this to work, the miner must prove unobtrusive, or it will be turned off, depriving the Monero network from a little bit of security. As such, it is likely that a smart miner will mine slower than a normal miner on the same hardware.
Smart mining is available in the official CLI and GUI wallet, which are available in the [downloads page](https://getmonero.org/downloads/).
It is hoped that the relative slowness of a smart miner (especially on low-power machines) will be offset by the large amount of people running a miner for a possible "lottery win", and thus increase the Monero network security by a non trivial amount. The increased hash rate from many different sources helps keep the Monero network decentralized.
{{ page.summary | capitalize }}.
---
layout: moneropedia
entry: "Spend Key"
terms: ["spend-key", "spend-keys"]
summary: "one of the two pairs of private and public cryptographic keys that each account has, with the *private* spend key used to spend any funds in the account"
......@@ -7,7 +6,7 @@ summary: "one of the two pairs of private and public cryptographic keys that eac
### The Basics
{{ page.summary | capitalize }}.
One of the two pairs of private and public cryptographic keys that each account has, with the *private* spend key used to spend any funds in the account.
### In-depth Information
......
Supports Markdown
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment