Commit 8d79f880 authored by Leza89's avatar Leza89
Browse files

German translation for getmonero.org

main:
 - [x] translated: de.yml - Status: peer-reviewed
 - [x] translated: lang\de\ - Status: peer-reviewed
 - [x] added: "de: Deutsch in other ymls"

resources:
 * untranslated: moneropedia - some terms added to match de.yml
 * untranslated: user guides
 * untranslated:  developer guides

Special thanks to ErCiccione and rodolfo912 as well as to rbrunner7
parent 8d3986e6
{% assign version = '1.1.0' | split: '.' %}
{% include disclaimer.html translated="false" version=page.version %}
Sometimes, your funds will become stuck - you will have some locked funds that never become unlocked. This is how you fix it.
- Load your wallet in monero-wallet-cli.
- Type
> seed
into the command prompt. Write down your 25 word seed, if you haven't already. This is the best way to make sure you don't loose access to your funds.
- Close monero-wallet-cli by typing
> exit
- Backup all of your wallet related files. These include:
> yourwalletname.bin
> yourwalletname.bin.keys
> yourwalletname.bin.address.txt
This can be done by copying the files to a new folder.
Sometimes, when creating your wallet, you might have named it something without the .bin part. In that case, the wallet file will be called yourwalletname without the .bin at the end.
- Delete yourwallet.bin
- Load monero-wallet-cli, type in the name of the wallet you just deleted
- Enter password. The wallet will now refresh and hopefully your locked funds will now become unlocked.
{% assign version = '1.1.0' | split: '.' %}
{% include disclaimer.html translated="false" version=page.version %}
# Importing the Blockchain to Monero GUI wallet (Windows)
### Step 1
Download the Current bootstrap from https://downloads.getmonero.org/blockchain.raw; you can skip this step if you are importing the Blockchain from another source.
### Step 2
Find the path of your Monero wallet (the folder where you extracted your wallet). For example mine is:
`D:\monero-gui-0.10.3.1`
Your path may be different depending on where you decided to download your wallet and what version of the Monero wallet you have.
### Step 3
Find the path of your downloaded Blockchain for example mine was:
`C:\Users\KeeJef\Downloads\blockchain.raw`
Yours might be different depending on where you downloaded the Blockchain to.
### Step 4
Open a Command Prompt window. You can do this by pressing the Windows key + R, and then typing in the popup box `CMD`
### Step 5
Now you need to navigate using the CMD window to the path of your Monero wallet. You can do this by typing:
`cd C:\YOUR\MONERO\WALLET\FILE\PATH\HERE`
It should look something like:
`cd D:\monero-gui-0.10.3.1`
If your Monero wallet is on another drive you can use `DriveLetter:` for example if your Monero wallet was on your D drive then before using the cd command you would do `D:`
### Step 6
Now type in your command prompt window:
`monero-blockchain-import --input-file C:\YOUR\BLOCKCHAIN\FILE\PATH\HERE`
For example I would type :
`monero-blockchain-import --input-file C:\Users\KeeJef\Downloads\blockchain.raw`
If you downloaded the Blockchain from a trusted, reputable source you may set `verify 0` this will reduce the amount of time to sync the Blockchain.
### Step 7
After the the Blockchain has finished syncing up you can open your Monero wallet normally. Your downloaded blockchain.raw can be deleted.
Author: Kee Jefferys
{% assign version = '1.1.0' | split: '.' %}
{% include disclaimer.html translated="false" version=page.version %}
## How to generate a Ledger Monero wallet with the CLI (monero-wallet-cli)
### Table of Content
* [1. Windows](#1-windows)
* [2. Mac OS X](#2-mac-os-x)
* [3. Linux](#3-linux)
* [4. Final notes](#4-a-few-final-notes)
### 1. Windows
We first have to ensure that we're sufficiently prepared. This entails the following:
1. This guide assumes you have already initialized your Ledger wallet and thus generated a 24 word mnemonic seed.
2. You need to run / use CLI v0.12.2.0, which can be found <a href="{{site.baseurl}}/downloads/">here</a>.
3. You need to install the Ledger Monero app and configure your system. Instructions can be found [here](https://github.com/LedgerHQ/blue-app-monero/blob/master/doc/user/bolos-app-monero.pdf) (sections 3.1.1 and 3.2.3 in particular). In addition, make sure to set the network to `Mainnet`
4. Your Ledger needs to be plugged in and the Ledger Monero app should be running.
5. Either your daemon (`monerod.exe`) should be running and preferably be fully synced or you should connect to a remote node.
Now that we're sufficiently prepared, let's start!
1. Go to the directory / folder monerod.exe and monero-wallet-cli.exe are located.
2. Open a new command prompt / powershell. This is done by first making sure your cursor isn't located on any of the files and subsequently doing SHIFT + right click. It will give you an option to "Open command window here". If you're using Windows 10 in latest version, it'll give you an option to "open the PowerShell window here".
3. Now type:
`monero-wallet-cli.exe --generate-from-device <new-wallet-name> --subaddress-lookahead 3:200` (Win 7 + 8)
`.\monero-wallet-cli.exe --generate-from-device <new-wallet-name> --subaddress-lookahead 3:200` (Win 10)
Note that is simply a placeholder for the actual wallet name. If you, for instance, want to name your wallet `MoneroWallet`, the command would be as follows:
`monero-wallet-cli.exe --generate-from-device MoneroWallet --subaddress-lookahead 3:200` (Win 7 + 8)
`.\monero-wallet-cli.exe --generate-from-device MoneroWallet --subaddress-lookahead 3:200` (Win 10)
4. The CLI will, after executing aforementioned command, prompt your for a password. Make sure to set a strong password and confirm it thereafter.
5. The Ledger will ask whether you want to export the private view key or not. First and foremost, your funds cannot be compromised with merely the private view key. Exporting the private view key enables the client (on the computer - Monero v0.12.2.0) to scan blocks looking for transactions that belong to your wallet / address. If this option is not utilized, the device (Ledger) will scan blocks, which will be significantly slower. There is, however, one caveat. That is, if your system gets compromised, the adversary will potentially be able to compromise your private view key as well, which is detrimental to privacy. This is virtually impossible when the private view key is not exported.
6. You may have to hit confirm twice before it proceeds.
7. Your Ledger Monero wallet will now be generated. Note that this may take up to 5-10 minutes. Furthermore, there will be no immediate feedback in the CLI nor on the Ledger.
8. `monero-wallet-cli` will start refreshing. Wait until it has fully refreshed.
Congratulations, you can now use your Ledger Monero wallet in conjunction with the CLI.
### 2. Mac OS X
We first have to ensure that we're sufficiently prepared. This entails the following:
1. This guide assumes you have already initialized your Ledger wallet and thus generated a 24 word mnemonic seed.
2. You need to run / use CLI v0.12.2.0, which can be found <a href="{{site.baseurl}}/downloads/">here</a>.
3. You need to install the Ledger Monero app and configure your system. Instructions can be found [here](https://github.com/LedgerHQ/blue-app-monero/blob/master/doc/user/bolos-app-monero.pdf) (sections 3.1.1 and 3.2.2 in particular). In addition, make sure to set the network to `Mainnet`
4. Note that the instructions for system configuration (section 3.2.2) on Mac OS X are quite elaborate and can be perceived as slightly convoluted. Fortunately, tficharmers has created a guide [here](https://monero.stackexchange.com/questions/8438/how-do-i-make-my-macos-detect-my-ledger-nano-s-when-plugged-in) that you can use for assistance.
5. Your Ledger needs to be plugged in and the Ledger Monero app should be running.
6. Either your daemon (`monerod`) should be running and preferably be fully synced or you should connect to a remote node.
Now that we're sufficiently prepared, let's start!
1. Use Finder to browse to the directory / folder `monero-wallet-cli` (CLI v0.12.2.0) is located.
2. Go to your desktop.
3. Open a new terminal (if don't know how to open a terminal, see [here](https://apple.stackexchange.com/a/256263)).
4. Drag `monero-wallet-cli` in the terminal. It should add the full path to the terminal. Do not hit enter.
5. Now type:
`--generate-from-device <new-wallet-name> --subaddress-lookahead 3:200`
Note that is simply a placeholder for the actual wallet name. If you, for instance, want to name your wallet `MoneroWallet`, the command would be as follows:
`--generate-from-device MoneroWallet --subaddress-lookahead 3:200`
Note that aforementioned text will be appended to the path of `monero-wallet-cli`. Thus, before you hit enter, your terminal should look like:
`/full/path/to/monero-wallet-cli --generate-from-device <new-wallet-name> --subaddress-lookahead 3:200`
Where the full path is, intuitively, the actual path on your Mac OS X.
7. The CLI will, after executing aforementioned command, prompt you for a password. Make sure to set a strong password and confirm it thereafter.
8. The Ledger will ask whether you want to export the private view key or not. First and foremost, your funds cannot be compromised with merely the private view key. Exporting the private view key enables the client (on the computer - Monero v0.12.2.0) to scan blocks looking for transactions that belong to your wallet / address. If this option is not utilized, the device (Ledger) will scan blocks, which will be significantly slower. There is, however, one caveat. That is, if your system gets compromised, the adversary will potentially be able to compromise your private view key as well, which is detrimental to privacy. This is virtually impossible when the private view key is not exported.
9. You may have to hit confirm twice before it proceeds.
10. Your Ledger Monero wallet will now be generated. Note that this may take up to 5-10 minutes. Furthermore, there will be no immediate feedback in the CLI nor on the Ledger.
11. `monero-wallet-cli` will start refreshing. Wait until it has fully refreshed.
12. Congratulations, you can now use your Ledger Monero wallet in conjunction with the CLI.
### 3. Linux
We first have to ensure that we're sufficiently prepared. This entails the following:
1. This guide assumes you have already initialized your Ledger wallet and thus generated a 24 word mnemonic seed.
2. You need to run / use CLI v0.12.2.0, which can be found <a href="{{site.baseurl}}/downloads/">here</a>.
3. You need to install the Ledger Monero app and configure your system. Instructions can be found [here](https://github.com/LedgerHQ/blue-app-monero/blob/master/doc/user/bolos-app-monero.pdf) (sections 3.1.1 and 3.2.1 in particular). In addition, make sure to set the network to `Mainnet`
4. Your Ledger needs to be plugged in and the Ledger Monero app should be running.
5. Either your daemon (`monerod`) should be running and preferably be fully synced or you should connect to a remote node.
Now that we're sufficiently prepared, let's start!
1. Go to the directory / folder monero-wallet-cli and monerod are located.
2. Open a new terminal
3. Now type:
`./monero-wallet-cli --generate-from-device <new-wallet-name> --subaddress-lookahead 3:200`
Note that is simply a placeholder for the actual wallet name. If you, for instance, want to name your wallet `MoneroWallet`, the command would be as follows:
`./monero-wallet-cli --generate-from-device MoneroWallet --subaddress-lookahead 3:200`
4. The CLI will, after executing aforementioned command, prompt your for a password. Make sure to set a strong password and confirm it thereafter.
5. The Ledger will ask whether you want to export the private view key or not. First and foremost, your funds cannot be compromised with merely the private view key. Exporting the private view key enables the client (on the computer - Monero v0.12.2.0) to scan blocks looking for transactions that belong to your wallet / address. If this option is not utilized, the device (Ledger) will scan blocks, which will be significantly slower. There is, however, one caveat. That is, if your system gets compromised, the adversary will potentially be able to compromise your private view key as well, which is detrimental to privacy. This is virtually impossible when the private view key is not exported.
6. You may have to hit confirm twice before it proceeds.
7. Your Ledger Monero wallet will now be generated. Note that this may take up to 5-10 minutes. Furthermore, there will be no immediate feedback in the CLI nor on the Ledger.
8. `monero-wallet-cli` will start refreshing. Wait until it has fully refreshed.
Congratulations, you can now use your Ledger Monero wallet in conjunction with the CLI.
### 4. A few final notes
1. We'd strongly advise to test the full process first. That is, send a small amount to the wallet and subsequently restore it (using aforementioned guide) to verify that you can recover the wallet. Note that, upon recreating / restoring the wallet, you ought to append the `--restore-height` flag (with a block height before the height of your first transaction to the wallet) to the command in step 3 (Windows), step 5 (Mac OS X), or step 3 (Linux). More information about the restore height and how to approximate it can be found [here](https://monero.stackexchange.com/questions/7581/what-is-the-relevance-of-the-restore-height).
2. If you use a remote node, append the `--daemon-address host:port` flag to the command in step 3 (Windows), step 5 (Mac OS X), or step 3 (Linux).
3. If desired, you can manually tweak the `--subaddress-lookahead` value. The first value is the number of accounts and the second value is the number of subaddresses per account. Thus, if you, for instance, want to pregenerate 5 accounts with 100 subaddresses each, use `--subaddress-lookahead 5:100`. Bear in mind that, the more subaddresses you pregenerate, the longer it takes for the Ledger to create your wallet.
4. You only have to use the `--generate-from-device` flag once (i.e. upon wallet creation). Thereafter, you'd basically use it similar to how you normally use the CLI. That is:
1. Make sure your Ledger is plugged in and the Monero app is running.
2. Open `monero-wallet-cli`.
3. Enter the wallet name of your Ledger Monero wallet.
4. Enter the password to open the wallet.
If the Ledger wallet files are not in the same directory as `monero-wallet-cli`, you ought to open `monero-wallet-cli` with the `--wallet-file /path/to/wallet.keys/file` flag. Alternatively, you can copy the Ledger wallet files to the same directory as `monero-wallet-cli`.
5. If you have any further questions or need assistance, please leave a comment to the original [StackExchange](https://monero.stackexchange.com/questions/8503/how-do-i-generate-a-ledger-monero-wallet-with-the-cli-monero-wallet-cli) answer.
Author: dEBRUYNE
Secondary scribe: el00ruobuob
{% assign version = '1.1.0' | split: '.' %}
{% include disclaimer.html translated="false" version=page.version %}
# Selecting a pool
There are many pools to choose from, a list is available at
[moneropools.com](https://moneropools.com). Mining on a larger pool could mean
more frequent payouts, but mining on a smaller pool helps to keep the network
decentralized.
# Selecting a CPU miner
Just like pools, there are a lot of miners to choose from. The one that you
should pick depends on the hardware you want to mine on. This guide will only
use a CPU miner, and will be using
[xmr-stak-cpu](https://github.com/fireice-uk/xmr-stak-cpu). Alternatives include
[wolf's CPUMiner](https://github.com/wolf9466/cpuminer-multi) and
[sgminer-gm](https://github.com/genesismining/sgminer-gm). However, their
configuration is slightly different and will not be covered in this guide.
## For Windows Systems
If you are using a Windows system, the developer of xmr-stak-cpu provides
binaries to download on the
[GitHub release page](https://github.com/fireice-uk/xmr-stak-cpu/releases).
Download `xmr-stak-cpu-win64.zip` and extract it somewhere you'll be able to
find it again.
## For Other Operating Systems
If you're not using Windows, you will have to compile xmr-stak-cpu for yourself,
luckily this isn't as hard as it sounds. Before you can compile the miner, you
will need to install some of its prerequisites.
For Debian-based distros:
sudo apt-get install libmicrohttpd-dev libssl-dev cmake build-essential
For Red Hat based distros:
sudo yum install openssl-devel cmake gcc-c++ libmicrohttpd-devel
<!-- TODO: Add dependencies for other operating systems? -->
Following this, you just need to use cmake to generate the build files, run
make and copy the config file:
mkdir build-$(gcc -dumpmachine)
cd $_
cmake ../
make -j$(nproc)
cp ../config.txt bin/
cd bin
Don't celebrate just yet, as the miner needs to be configured. Running the miner
now should give you a block of text to copy and paste:
![image1](png/mine_to_pool/1.png)
Open `config.txt` and *replace* the two `"cpu_threads_conf"` lines with the text
you just copied. It should look something like this afterwards:
![image2](png/mine_to_pool/2.png)
Scroll down in the file until you see the lines containing `"pool_address"`.
*Replace* the contents of the second set of quotes with the address and port of
the pool you chose earlier. You can find this information on the pool's website.
Put your wallet address between the quotes on the wallet address. You may leave
the password blank unless the pool specifies otherwise.
After this, your config should look something like this:
![image3](png/mine_to_pool/3.png)
# Running the miner
**Save the config** file and run the miner!
![image4](png/mine_to_pool/4.png)
Some pools allow you to monitor your hashrate by pasting your address into their
website. You can also monitor your hashrate by pressing the `h` key.
# Tuning the miner
You might see nasty messages like this:
[2017-07-09 12:04:02] : MEMORY ALLOC FAILED: mmap failed
This means that you can get around a 20% hashrate boost by enabling large pages.
## Large pages on Linux
Firstly stop the miner (if it's running), run the following commands to enable
large pages and then start the miner as root:
sudo sysctl -w vm.nr_hugepages=128
sudo ./xmr-stak-cpu
## Large pages on Windows
Taken from `config.txt`:
>By default we will try to allocate large pages. This means you need to "Run As Administrator" on Windows
You need to edit your system's group policies to enable locking large pages. Here are the steps from MSDN
1. On the Start menu, click Run. In the Open box, type gpedit.msc.
2. On the Local Group Policy Editor console, expand Computer Configuration, and then expand Windows Settings.
3. Expand Security Settings, and then expand Local Policies.
4. Select the User Rights Assignment folder.
5. The policies will be displayed in the details pane.
6. In the pane, double-click Lock pages in memory.
7. In the Local Security Setting – Lock pages in memory dialog box, click Add User or Group.
8. In the Select Users, Service Accounts, or Groups dialog box, add an account that you will run the miner on
9. Reboot for change to take effect.
{% assign version = '1.1.0' | split: '.' %}
{% include disclaimer.html translated="false" version=page.version %}
## Introduction
This guide is two fold, ease of use for mining on Linux distributions and some extra security around mining as most of these miners have not had security auditing.
At the end of this guide you will be able to sleep a little easier knowing that if the miner gets exploited it will not migrate to your OS.
### Why Docker
[Docker](https://www.docker.com/) is being used as it is the most well known and has the biggest chance to be already installed.
The container I am using is [alpine-xmrig](https://hub.docker.com/r/bitnn/alpine-xmrig/) as per the name it is built on the [Alpine Linux](https://www.alpinelinux.org/) image.
If you are interested in getting started with Docker, here are some really good starting references.
* Arch Linux Wiki [Docker Page](https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Docker)
* Container Solutions [Security Cheat Sheet](http://container-solutions.com/content/uploads/2015/06/15.06.15_DockerCheatSheet_A2.pdf)
* Digital Oceans [Dockerfile Howto](https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/docker-explained-using-dockerfiles-to-automate-building-of-images).
For distribution specific installation please refer to the [Docker Docs](https://docs.docker.com/engine/installation/) website.
### Why XMRig
[XMRig](https://github.com/xmrig/xmrig) is just a really solid miner to me. Nice output and statistics, no flashy web-ui's or dependencies. The XMRig container is only ~4MB what makes it extremely portable.
#### Step 1: Mining with XMRig
Run the following
```bash
# docker run --restart unless-stopped --read-only -m 50M -c 512 bitnn/alpine-xmrig -o POOL01 -o POOL02 -u WALLET -p PASSWORD -k
# docker run --restart unless-stopped --read-only -m 50M -c 512 bitnn/alpine-xmrig -o pool.supportxmr.com:7777 -u 45CJVagd6WwQAQfAkS91EHiTyfVaJn12uM4Su8iz6S2SHZ3QthmFM9BSPHVZY388ASWx8G9Wbz4BA24RQZUpGczb35fnnJz -p docker:secret -k
```
#### Step 2: There is no Step 2
You have already done everything you need to do. You are now mining in a docker container with XMRig `ctrl+c` to exit the miner or add `-d` just after `docker run` to background the miner.
{% assign version = '1.1.0' | split: '.' %}
{% include disclaimer.html translated="false" version=page.version %}
# monero-wallet-cli
`monero-wallet-cli` is the wallet software that ships with the Monero tree. It is a console program,
and manages an account. While a bitcoin wallet manages both an account and the blockchain,
Monero separates these: `monerod` handles the blockchain, and `monero-wallet-cli` handles the account.
This guide will show how to perform various operations from the `monero-wallet-cli` UI. The guide assumes you are using the most recent version of Monero and have already created an account according to the other guides.
## Checking your balance
Since the blockchain handling and the wallet are separate programs, many uses of `monero-wallet-cli`
need to work with the daemon. This includes looking for incoming transactions to your address.
Once you are running both `monero-wallet-cli` and `monerod`, enter `balance`.
Example:
This will pull blocks from the daemon the wallet did not yet see, and update your balance
to match. This process will normally be done in the background every minute or so. To see the
balance without refreshing:
balance
Balance: 64.526198850000, unlocked balance: 44.526198850000, including unlocked dust: 0.006198850000
In this example, `Balance` is your total balance. The `unlocked balance` is the amount currently available to spend. Newly received transactions require 10 confirmations on the blockchain before being unlocked. `unlocked dust` refers to very small amounts of unspent outputs that may have accumulated in your account.
## Sending monero
You will need the standard address you want to send to (a long string starting with '4'), and
possibly a payment ID, if the receiving party requires one. In that latter case, that party
may instead give you an integrated address, which is both of these packed into a single address.
### Sending to a standard address:
transfer ADDRESS AMOUNT PAYMENTID
Replace `ADDRESS` with the address you want to send to, `AMOUNT` with how many monero you want to send,
and `PAYMENTID` with the payment ID you were given. Payment ID's are optional. If the receiving party doesn't need one, just
omit it.
### Sending to an integrated address:
transfer ADDRESS AMOUNT
The payment ID is implicit in the integrated address in that case.
### Specify the number of outputs for a transaction:
transfer RINGSIZE ADDRESS AMOUNT
Replace `RINGSIZE` with the number of outputs you wish to use. **If not specified, the default is 7.** It's a good idea to use the default, but you can increase the number if you want to include more outputs. The higher the number, the larger the transaction, and higher fees are needed.
## Receiving monero
If you have your own Monero address, you just need to give your standard address to someone.
You can find out your address with:
address
Since Monero is anonymous, you won't see the origin address the funds you receive came from. If you
want to know, for instance to credit a particular customer, you'll have to tell the sender to use
a payment ID, which is an arbitrary optional tag which gets attached to a transaction. To make life
easier, you can generate an address that already includes a random payment ID:
integrated_address
This will generate a random payment ID, and give you the address that includes your own account
and that payment ID. If you want to select a particular payment ID, you can do that too:
integrated_address 12346780abcdef00
Payments made to an integrated address generated from your account will go to your account,
with that payment id attached, so you can tell payments apart.
## Proving to a third party you paid someone
If you pay a merchant, and the merchant claims to not have received the funds, you may need
to prove to a third party you did send the funds - or even to the merchant, if it is a honest
mistake. Monero is private, so you can't just point to your transaction in the blockchain,
as you can't tell who sent it, and who received it. However, by supplying the per-transaction
private key to a party, that party can tell whether that transaction sent monero to that
particular address. Note that storing these per-transaction keys is disabled by default, and
you will have to enable it before sending, if you think you may need it:
set store-tx-info 1
You can retrieve the tx key from an earlier transaction:
get_tx_key 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012
Pass in the transaction ID you want the key for. Remember that a payment might have been
split in more than one transaction, so you may need several keys. You can then send that key,
or these keys, to whoever you want to provide proof of your transaction, along with the
transaction id and the address you sent to. Note that this third party, if knowing your
own address, will be able to see how much change was returned to you as well.
If you are the third party (that is, someone wants to prove to you that they sent monero
to an address), then you can check this way:
check_tx_key TXID TXKEY ADDRESS
Replace `TXID`, `TXKEY` and `ADDRESS` with the transaction ID, per-transaction key, and destination
address which were supplied to you, respectively. monero-wallet-cli will check that transaction
and let you know how much monero this transaction paid to the given address.
## Getting a chance to confirm/cancel payments
If you want to get a last chance confirmation when sending a payment:
set always-confirm-transfers 1
## How to find a payment to you
If you received a payment using a particular payment ID, you can look it up:
payments PAYMENTID
You can give more than one payment ID too.
More generally, you can review incoming and outgoing payments:
show_transfers
You can give an optional height to list only recent transactions, and request
only incoming or outgoing transactions. For example,
show_transfers in 650000
will only show incoming transfers after block 650000. You can also give a height
range.
If you want to mine, you can do so from the wallet:
start_mining 2
This will start mining on the daemon usin two threads. Note that this is solo mining,
and may take a while before you find a block. To stop mining:
stop_mining
{% assign version = '1.1.0' | split: '.' %}
{% include disclaimer.html translated="false" version=page.version %}
# Monero tools
These tools can be used to gain information about the Monero network or your transaction data in the blockchain.
### [Check that a recipient has received your funds](http://xmrtests.llcoins.net/checktx.html)
### [Tools for monero address generation](https://xmr.llcoins.net/)
### [Monero node count](http://moneronodes.i2p.xyz/)
### [Monero node map](https://monerohash.com/nodes-distribution.html)
### [Monero offline wallet generator](http://moneroaddress.org/)
### [Monero network statistics](http://moneroblocks.info/stats)
### [Monero.how statistics](https://www.monero.how/)
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